#3601

On second reading, I would say that the author is trying to say that contraception is more serious than venial, but he never calls it a mortal sin. He states that the opinion of many scholars is that contraception is not a mortal sin. There`is clearly uncertainty among chuch scholars on this issue.

In anonymous polls, 70% of priests don’t even believe contraception is a mortal sin, or even a sin at all. 90% of Catholics ignore the teaching–many awesome wives and mothers are bieng sent to Hell every day if this is truly a “mortal sin.”

The priest at my Engaged Encounter said that non-abortifacient (sp?) birth control was not a sin, but rather could lead a person down a road into sin by objectifying the spouse. I can hardly believe a priest at an official Catholic event with 50 people around could be wrong.

Also, John Paul refused to make the teaching infallable, showing that he knew it could be wrong. If he were sure it were a mortal sin, I really believe he would have called it an infallable teaching.

I think the Church has so much dissent on this issue because of the people who are in circumstances like the ones I mentioned in my initial post. I have a friend (pregnant 4 times in 5 years doing NFP (and not trying to get pregnant)) with a chronic disease who has been told to not have anymore children or she will die. She, at 32 years old, is afraid of having sex with her husband. NFP didn’t work for her, and she has no alternative than to abstain. We’re all married women on here, and we all know how important this part of life is (especially to the husbands). I think it’s so sad that the Church (officially) doesn’t take situations like this into account.